IELTS Speaking: Using the phrasal verbs – part 3

Boss around

to tell someone what to do, give orders.

1. It really gets me when she starts bossing people around.

2. I can’t stand being bossed around by the manager.

Be bogged down

to be hindered in movement; to be prevented from making progress.

1. The tractor is bogged down in the mud.

2. The enemy troops had been bogged down; supply had not kept up with them.

Cut it out

to stop, desist.

1. Cut it out, will you? I want to say something to you.

2. I’m sick of you two squabbling, just cut it out!

Cordon off

to surround or blockade with or as with a cordon.

1. Police cordoned off the area until the bomb was defused.

2. The police cordoned off the street.

Wrap something up

to cover something completely in paper or other material.

1. He spent the evening wrapping up the Christmas presents.

2. Let’s wrap up the meeting before 5 o’clock.

Zone out

to fall asleep, become unconscious or stop paying attention.

1. People need to zone out for a bit to get back their concentration.

2. After working six hours straight, I zoned out in front of my computer screen.

Zip up

to close with a zipper.

1. The dress zips up at the back.

2. Zip up your jacket – it’s cold.

Worm something out of someone

to elicit or make one’s way by artful or devious means.

1. He tried to worm the answer out of her.

2. She can’t worm out of this situation.

Vouch for someone

to declare as with warrant.

1. He cannot vouch for the accuracy of the story.

2. I can vouch for his honesty.

Trip over something

to fall by stepping on.

1. The boy tripped over a stone.

2. If you leave your shoes lying around like that, you’ll trip over them.

Continue reading the rest two parts:

>>IELTS Speaking: Using the phrasal verbs – part 1

>>IELTS Speaking: Using the phrasal verbs – part 2

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