IELTS Writing: Children’s punishment

Do you think that parents should be punished if their five-year-old child commits a crime? From what age should children be held responsible for their own behaviours?

Nowadays, some families get trouble with their five-year-old disruptive children. However, whether parents themselves should be punished if their little child commits a crime remains a controversial issue. I agree with the view that parents should be taught and punished first and children ought to be held responsible after 18-year-old.

Firstly, it is obvious that disruptive children mostly come from violent families. Adults are the first teachers of the little kids who are at their impressionable age, so that once the kids do anything inappropriate, parents have to clear the problems, face themselves and introspect. Parents therefore should always keep in mind that they have to provide a model for children to imitate.

Moreover, as the children are curious about everything and quick to learn at that stage, parents have to shoulder the responsibilities to play a vital role as protectors. The TV and gaming, for example sometimes contain the questionable contents that would mislead the children, so parents have to prevent them from watching these programmes.

That is not to say that when do something wrong, children can not be blamed at all. If children continue the unacceptable behaviours after being explained what they are expected of, they should be given serious warning that what they do is not permitted. Stopping the inappropriate behaviours on the spot is an effective method to teach children how to distinguish right from wrong.

In sum, the best way to reduce misbehaviour is to provide abundant positive reinforcement for good behaviour; meanwhile, parents should protect their children from questionable contents. Only by doing so can we ensure that children can be encouraged and develop in a healthy environment.

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