IELTS Writing: Whether adverts are the main power

The high sales of popular consumer goods reflect the power of advertising but not the real need of the society where such products are sold. To what extent do you agree or disagree?

Nowadays, the advertisement in some way promotes the booming of economy in many countries. However, whether it ultimately helps the sales of popular consumer goods remains a controversial issue. I agree with the view that despite the attractive adverts all over the markets, it is indeed the demand that determines the sales.

First, it is obvious that if there is no real need of products in the markets, the manufacturers will not dare produce the goods. This is because before starting the production lines, the manufacturers have to do a wide range of marketing surveys to explore the consumers’ demand. Therefore, every product in the markets is produced to cater for a particular part of consumers.

Moreover, once the goods are put into the markets, apart from the demand, there are some other factors, such as spending habits, that determine the purchase, not just the adverts alone. In the South Korea, for example, people love to purchase their domestic brands of cars instead of the internationally famous counterparts because of their brand loyalty. In such situations, what the adverts can do is few.

That is not to say that the adverts in the markets are totally useless. Honestly, adverts can sometimes evoke the impulse buying, boost the sales and therefore numerous companies are keen on investing a great amount of funds on advertising. But definitely, only some of the adverts fortunately work due to the basic principle behind the markets.

In sum, consumers’ demand is the fundamental power of the markets; meanwhile, adverts can definitely help boost the sales in the right place. Only fully harness the advantageous aspects of them can help businessmen make profits in the competitive markets.

280 words

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