IELTS Speaking topic: Schools

1. How old were you when you started school?
2. Where did you go to school?
3. How did you get to school each day?
4. Tell me something about the school. (=Can you describe it?)
5. Did you enjoy it? (Why?/Why not?)
6. What were some of the most popular activities at primary school?
7. Have you ever returned to see your old school again?
8. Are you still in contact with any of the friends you had in primary school?
9. What subjects did you study in secondary school (=high school)?
10. What was your favourite subject in secondary school (=high school)?
11. And which subject did you like the least? (Why?)
12. Which secondary school subject do you think is most useful for people in adult life?
13. What part of your secondary school education did you enjoy most?
14. How do you feel about your high school (secondary school)?
15. Why did you choose to attend that particular school?
16. Which class did you enjoy the most? (Why?)

I started my elementary school since seven year old.

My school was just located near my home, so every day I walked to school with myself, or sometimes with my neighbours.

My school is called the Haiyang Elementary School, which was established 50 years ago in my hometown. The school was quite spacious as it was large but there were no many students. Besides, the teachers there were always kind-hearted and responsible for their teaching.

Yes, it’s very memorable days of life cos it’s part of my life I got basic education from my school, besides, I didn’t have the stressful study burden at that period, so most of time I played with my classmates a lot. Therefore, it’s a golden period of my life and school days never come back.

There are several engaging activities in my school, such as sports meeting when the whole school played sports together. There were some exciting competitions like 100 metres dash, or marathon. Besides, we went autumn outing every year to some local natural sceneries. We didn’t have class and could enjoy the happy time with our classmates there.

Yes, every time I go back to my hometown, I’d like to visit my old school and I’ll be very delighted to see how my school developed. I was really proud of it.

Yes, there were several close friends when I was in my elementary school, and we still keep in touch with each other. We cherish our friendship after we have grown up.

There were many subjects we had to learn at secondary school, such as maths, English, physics, chemistry, history, geography, and so on. So you can see we had a heavy burden at that time.

In my secondary school, English was my favourite subject because I found it very easy to remember the new word, and the sentences I learned were not hard at all. Besides, thanks to my English teacher, he taught me and corrected my pronunciation so that I could speak quite influent English.

As my unfavourable subject, I guess the politics was the most disgusting subject because I had to remember endless and meaningless essays in order to pass the exams by rote. It was really a waste of my time.

I believe that the physics was quite helpful in my adult life. Though it wasn’t really needed in daily life of mine, just as my physical teacher said, the physics was the gymnastics for the brain, it helped me do things logically.

I believe that my secondary school had taught how to endure hardships if I wanted to achieve my goal. You know, in my country, the competition of entering university is badly fierce, so I had to work very hard in order to be eligible to pursue my education in the future.

I guess my secondary school has a rich history and provides a safe, supportive learning community where all students are challenged to reach their highest levels of achievement and grow as individuals.

I chose to attend my school because it was the most famous school in my hometown. It has gone through so long history that many scientists and politics graduated from it. And I believe I could be qualified to get to university after years of studying there.

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